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Language Arts Department

 
Recommended Course  
Course: English I
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credits: 1.0
Prerequisite: None
English I students study literature, reading comprehension, vocabulary, essay development, research, functional text, and communication. Through the study of novels, short stories, poetry, drama, and nonfiction, students analyze literary elements and devices, text structure, author’s purpose, and historical significance. Students develop strategies for reading comprehension and vocabulary acquisition through explicit instruction, teacher models, and think-alouds. Students write a variety of multi-paragraph essays with emphasis on the writing process. Grammar instruction is integrated within writing activities. Students study the research process and complete a research paper. Students study a variety of communication strategies and applications. 
 

 
Recommended Course  
Course: English II 
Grades: 10, 11, 12 
Credits: 1.0 
Prerequisite: English I
English II students study literature, reading comprehension, vocabulary, essay development, research, functional text, and communication. Through the study of novels, short stories, poetry drama, and nonfiction, students analyze literary elements and devices, text structure, author’s purpose, and historical significance. Students develop strategies for reading comprehension and vocabulary acquisition through explicit instruction, teacher models, and think-alouds. Students write a variety of multi-paragraph essays with emphasis on the writing process. Grammar instruction is integrated within writing activities. Students study the research process and complete a research paper. Students study a variety of communication strategies and applications. 

 
Recommended Course  
Course: English III 
Grades: 11, 12
Credits: 1.0
Prerequisite: English II
English III students study literature, reading comprehension, vocabulary, essay development, functional text, and research. Through the study of American literature covering the periods from 1400-present, students analyze literary elements and devices, text structure, author’s purpose, and historical significance. Students develop strategies for reading comprehension and vocabulary acquisition through explicit instruction, teacher models, and think-alouds. Grammar instruction is integrated within writing activities. Students study the research process.
 

 
Recommended Course  
Course: English IV
Grades: 12
Credits: 1.0
Prerequisite: English III
English IV students study literature, reading comprehension, vocabulary, and functional text. Through the study of British literature covering the periods form 449-present, students analyze literary elements and devices, text structure, author’s purpose, and historical significance. Students develop strategies for reading comprehension and vocabulary acquisition through explicit instruction, teacher models, and think-alouds and apply these strategies to complex texts. Students write a variety of essays with an emphasis on responding to literature through analysis and synthesis.
 
 
Recommended Course  
Course: Communications through Computer Applications
Grades: 9
Credits: 0.5
Prerequisite: None
This semester course is designed for students to apply and evaulate basic computer operations and concepts.  Throughout the semester, students will focus on applying and enhancing word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database skills.  Students will begin to research potential post-secondary options and create a resume and cover letter.  21st Century Communications Skills such as Web 2.0, Internet safety and digital citzenship will also be addressed.
 
 
 Elective Course  
Course: Literature of Early America
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credits: 0.5
Prerequisite: Passed last English class
This course is a survey of some well-known and more obscure literature of the early American period, roughly 1607-1790. We will begin with accounts of colonial settlement in Captain John Smith’s “A Description of New England” and end with John Woolman’s journal essays on social reform and the abolition of slavery in the newly emancipated United States. Get inside the minds of America’s earliest settlers and most influential thinkers, and rediscover our American heritage. 

 
Elective Course  
Course: Basics of English Grammar
Grades: 9
Credits: 0.5
Prerequisite: None
This course provides students with a review of basic grammar, usage, and mechanics. Units of study include review of the parts of speech, identification of the elements of a sentence, formation of different types of sentences, and development of the paragraph. Vocabulary study will also be a component of this course, with a focus on building vocabulary necessary for successful reading comprehension and writing in the content areas of science, mathematics, and social studies.
 

 
 
Elective Course  
Course: Composition
Grades: 10
Credits: 0.5
Prerequisite: None
This course follows the Grammar elective and instructs the student in the purpose and development of different forms of writing, including essays, technical writing, and workplace writing. Students will learn to distinguish these forms and craft their writing to suit the required purposes. They will identify purpose and audience, main idea, topic sentences and supporting details; they will examine how the writer used outside sources to support his/her argument and identify specific vocabulary and descriptive phrases the writer used to enhance his argument. This study instructs students to avoid plagiarism through reading for details, paraphrasing, summarizing, and citing their sources of information. Students are required to produce three written works: one essay with in-text citations, one business letter, and one process analysis/technical writing piece. 

 
Elective Course  
Course: Keystone Literature
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credits: 0.5
Prerequisite: Below Basic or Basic on Keystone Literature Exam
This one-semester, half-credit course provides remediation as preparation for retaking the Keystone Literature Exam for those students who scored "basic" or "below basic" on their most recent attempt on the exam. The curriculum includes review of Keystone Literature vocabulary terms; Tier 3 vocabulary; comprehension, analysis, and interpretation of literary fiction and non- fiction; analysis of informational texts; and open-ended writing practice. The course utilizes a variety of texts and teacher- generated resources, as well as practice and assessment in Study Island.