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Course Catalog

  • An exclamation mark (!) after a course title means the classis required for graduation.
  • An asterisk (*) after a course title means the class may be canceled if enrollment is not high enough to offer the class as planned.
  • A plus (+) after a course title means a co/extra-curricular component may be offered with the class. However, if no supplemental contracts for the year are offered, the co/extracurricular part of the course may be canceled.
  • A tilde (~) after a course title designates that fundraising opportunities will be offered to offset the cost of the program.


Courses

Language Arts

Communication Studies through Computer ApplicationsCourse Length: Full YearCredits: 1.0Subject: Language ArtsPrerequisites: None

This course is designed for students to apply and evaluate basic computer operations and concepts. Throughout the year, students will focus on applying and enhancing word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database skills. Students will begin to research potential post-secondary options and create a resume and cover letter, as well as explore and participate in the job application process. 21st Century Communications Skills such as Web 2.0, Internet safety and digital citizenship will also be addressed. Students will also learn about different styles of writing and practicing correct grammar.

English 2Course Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: Language ArtsPrerequisites: Communication Studies Through Computer Applications or English 1

English II students study literature, reading comprehension, vocabulary, essay development, research, functional text, and communication. Through the study of novels, short stories, poetry drama, and nonfiction, students analyze literary elements and devices, text structure, author’s purpose, and historical significance. Students develop strategies for reading comprehension and vocabulary acquisition through explicit instruction, teacher models, and think-alouds. Students write a variety of multi-paragraph essays with emphasis on the writing process. Grammar instruction is integrated within writing activities. Students study the research process and complete a research paper. Students study a variety of communication strategies and applications. 

English 3 Part 1Course Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Language ArtsPrerequisites: Career Language Arts or English 2

English 3 A is the first semester of a two-part course. Students study literature, reading comprehension, vocabulary, essay development, functional text, and research. Through the study of American literature covering the periods of Exploration to Post- Revolution/Early Nationalism, students analyze literary elements and devices, text structure, author’s purpose, and historical significance. Students develop strategies for reading comprehension and vocabulary acquisition through explicit instruction, teacher models, and think-alouds. Grammar instruction is integrated within writing activities. Students study the research process. 

English 3 Part 2Course Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Language ArtsPrerequisites: Career Language Arts or English 2

English 3 B is the second semester of a two-part course. Students study literature, reading comprehension, vocabulary, essay development, functional text, and research. Through the study of American literature covering the literary periods of American Romanticism to Post-Modernism, students analyze literary elements and devices, text structure, author’s purpose, and historical significance. Students develop strategies for reading comprehension and vocabulary acquisition through explicit instruction, teacher models, and think-alouds. Grammar instruction is integrated within writing activities. 

English 4 Part 1Course Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Language ArtsPrerequisites: English 3

English 4 A is the first semester of a two-part course. Students study literature, reading comprehension, vocabulary, and functional text. Through the study of British literature, covering the Anglo-Saxon through the Renaissance periods, students analyze literary elements and devices, text structure, author’s purpose, and historical significance. Students develop strategies for reading comprehension and vocabulary acquisition through explicit instruction, teacher models, and think-alouds and apply these strategies to complex texts. Students write a variety of essays with an emphasis on responding to literature through analysis and synthesis. 

English 4 Part 2Course Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Language ArtsPrerequisites: English 3

English 4 B is the second semester of a two-part course. Students study literature, reading comprehension, vocabulary, and functional text. Through the study of British literature, covering the Restoration/Enlightenment through the Contemporary period, students analyze literary elements and devices, text structure, author’s purpose, and historical significance. Students develop strategies for reading comprehension and vocabulary acquisition through explicit instruction, teacher models, and think- alouds and apply these strategies to complex texts. Students write a variety of essays with an emphasis on responding to literature through analysis and synthesis. 

Literature of Early AmericaCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Language ArtsPrerequisites: Passed last English course

This course is a survey of some well-known and more obscure literature of the early American period, roughly 1607-1790. We will begin with accounts of colonial settlement in Captain John Smith’s “A Description of New England” and end with John Woolman’s journal essays on social reform and the abolition of slavery in the newly emancipated United States. Get inside the minds of America’s earliest settlers and most influential thinkers, and rediscover our American heritage. 

American Protest LiteratureCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Language ArtsPrerequisites: Passed last English course

Experience the dramatic impact of literature to achieve social change in this survey of a selection of American literary works. This course examines a variety of influential pieces, including Thomas Paine's pamphlet Common Sense, which challenged the British government's authority over the American colonies; Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, credited for intensifying abolitionist sentiments prior to the Civil War; and Rebecca Harding Davis's novella, Life in the Iron Mills, realistically depicting the life of an iron-mill worker and the hardships suffered by the working class during the age of growing industrialization. 

Keystone LiteratureCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Language ArtsPrerequisites: Below Basic or Basic on Keystone Literature Exam

This one-semester, half-credit course provides remediation as preparation for retaking the Keystone Literature Exam for those students who scored "basic" or "below basic" on their most recent attempt on the exam. The curriculum includes review of Keystone Literature vocabulary terms; Tier 3 vocabulary; comprehension, analysis, and interpretation of literary fiction and non- fiction; analysis of informational texts; and open-ended writing practice. The course utilizes a variety of texts and teacher- generated resources, as well as practice and assessment in Study Island. 

Career Language Arts ACourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Language ArtsPrerequisites: None

Career Language Arts A is the first half of a two-part course that prepares students for real-world application of reading, comprehension, analysis, synthesis, writing, listening, and speaking skills at the level they will need to be successful beyond high school. Students read and analyze primarily non-fiction texts, draft intelligent and insightful written responses, and participate in verbal discussions in live sessions and on discussion boards. Students will learn how to engage with, analyze, and respond to media. They will also read, interpret, and respond to career and field-related texts. Students will create career and skill-related instructional videos using their iPads to demonstrate proficient communication and the ability to teach peers a practical skill.

Career Language Arts BCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Language ArtsPrerequisites: None

Career Language Arts B is the second half of a two-part course that prepares students for real-world application of reading, comprehension, analysis, synthesis, writing, listening, and speaking skills at the level they will need to be successful beyond high school. Students read and analyze primarily non-fiction texts, draft intelligent and insightful written responses, and participate in verbal discussions in live sessions and on discussion boards. Students will learn how to engage with, analyze, and respond to media. They will also read, interpret, and respond to career and field-related texts. Students will create career and skill-related instructional videos using their iPads to demonstrate proficient communication and the ability to teach peers a practical skill. Part B of the course adds practical reading and comprehension of literature that is helpful and necessary for students’ success beyond high school, including legal forms, along with tax, financial, and real estate documents. 

Mathematics

Pre-AlgebraCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 9, 10Credits: 1.0Subject: MathematicsPrerequisites: None

Pre-Algebra is designed to help prepare you for Algebra 1. The major concepts covered in this course include using variables and finding solutions, solving equations, working with integers, geometry concepts, working with graphs, and probability.

Algebra 1Course Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: MathematicsPrerequisites: Pre-Algebra

Algebra I includes the continued study of variables, equations, and functions. Topics include: solving equations and inequalities, simplifying expressions, polynomials and factoring, graphing, radicals and expanding arithmetic knowledge.

Algebra 2Course Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: MathematicsPrerequisites: Algebra 1

Algebra 2 is a continuation of the topics of Algebra 1. The main concept covered is functions, including linear, quadratic, radical, rational, exponential and logarithmic, as well as their transformations. Counting principles, probability, and sequences and series are also presented during the course. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course as a tool to help provide a better understanding of the concepts.

GeometryCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: MathematicsPrerequisites: Algebra 1

Geometry emphasizes skills necessary for problem-solving and continued growth in mathematics through the use of geometric terms and processes, logic and problem-solving. Topics covered include properties, congruence, and similarity of triangles, area, and perimeter of polygons, properties of circles and coordinate geometry. Methods of completing proofs are also presented.

Business MathCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: MathematicsPrerequisites: Algebra 1

This course covers the various aspects of consumer-oriented business practices, which include keeping financial records; figuring pay rates, benefits, and commissions; understanding metric measures; and borrowing, saving and investing money. Practice problems in the course promote proficiency in dealing with everyday mathematical situations.

Probability and StatisticsCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: MathematicsPrerequisites: Algebra 1

This course is geared toward students who have at least completed Algebra I. This course introduces students to the basic concepts and logic of statistical reasoning and probability. Topics covered include Data Collections and Displays, Linear Relationships, Distributions, Representations of Data Sets, Central Tendency and Dispersion, Probabilities of Simple Events, Probabilities of Dependent/Independent Events.

Keystone AlgebraCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: MathematicsPrerequisites: Below Basic or Basic on Keystone Algebra Exam

Keystone Algebra is specifically designed for students to advance their mastery of the state standards for mathematics. The course gives an in-depth look at many of the topics covered in Algebra 1.

PrecalculusCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: MathematicsPrerequisites: Algebra 2, Geometry

Precalculus builds on algebraic concepts to prepare students for calculus. The course begins with a review of basic algebraic concepts and moves into operations with functions, where students manipulate functions and their graphs. Precalculus also provides a detailed look at trigonometric functions, their graphs, the trigonometric identities, and the unit circle. Finally, students are introduced to polar coordinates, parametric equations, and limits.

Science

EcologyCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: SciencePrerequisites: None

This course will be part one of two worth 0.5 credits and must be taken before Biology. It will cover the scientific method, Ecological Organization and Energy Flow, Biomes, Biodiversity and conservation, Biogeochemical Cycles, and evolution. We will be utilizing simulations, labs, and projects to demonstrate mastery of the content. 

BiologyCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: SciencePrerequisites: Ecology

This course will be part two of two worth 0.5 credits and must be taken after ecology. It will cover the cell and cell processes, cell cycle, heredity, and genetics. We will be utilizing simulations, labs, and projects to demonstrate mastery of the content.

Earth ScienceCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 1..0Subject: SciencePrerequisites: None

This course is designed as a two semester, third or fourth-year course in high school. Both Geology and Astronomy topics are presented, building on earlier science competencies that students have gained. Topics from the history of the universe and the Earth to modern topics are presented. Additional topics from Oceanography and Atmospheric Science are included as well. Approximately 150 hours of seat time are required to complete the course.

Scientific Measure and MatterCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: SciencePrerequisites: None

This course is designed to be a standalone course, worth 0.5 credits. It will be an introductory course to focusing on describing matter. It will cover scientific method, making measurements and calculations, matter and atomic structure, the periodic table and chemical names and formulas. This is part one of a two-part course.

Motion and EnergyCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: SciencePrerequisites: None

This course will be part two of two, worth 0.5 credits. It will be an introductory course to the interactions of matter. It will cover Newton's laws, energy, and waves and how these topics relate.

General ScienceCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: SciencePrerequisites: None

This is a full credit course designed to summarize what students have learned in their other science courses. Some of the topics covered throughout the course include the methods for scientific measurement, the structure and function of cells, the construction of the universe, and the ecological interaction of ecosystems. This course is a great way to pull everything in science together. Some labs and projects will be required.

AnatomyCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: SciencePrerequisites: None

This one-semester course centers on the function and organization of living organisms. Students will explore the body systems such as cardiovascular, muscular, skeletal, and digestive. In addition, students will look more closely at the cells of each of these systems and compare their functions and structures. This is a great follow-up course for students who have completed biology. Some labs and projects will be required.

Conservation of ResourcesCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: SciencePrerequisites: None

Students will learn about our natural resources and how they contribute to our lives. Some resources, such as air, are renewable and, with proper management, will never be exhausted. Other resources, such as coal, are limited. We have to plan how to use them intelligently and plan for an era when they no longer will be available. This course will help students make wise decisions about resources and investigate related careers in their field.

Introduction to ChemistryCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: SciencePrerequisites: 80% in Algebra 1

This course will be part one of two, worth 0.5 credits. It will cover the fundamentals of chemistry including measurements and calculations, matter and change atomic structure, the periodic table and chemical names and formulas. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the option to go into Applications of Chemistry. We will be utilizing simulations, labs, and projects to demonstrate mastery of the content.

Applications in ChemistryCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: SciencePrerequisites: Introduction to Chemistry

This course will be part two of two, worth 0.5 credits. It will build from the fundamentals of chemistry learned in the introduction to chemistry course. During this course we will cover balancing chemical equations, stoichiometry, limiting reagents, kinetic molecular theory, gas laws, solutions, and concentration. 

Marine BiologyCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: SciencePrerequisites: None

About 70% of the Earth is covered by water. Even today, much of the world's oceans remain unexplored. Marine scientists make new discoveries about aquatic life every day. Marine Biology is a one-semester course in which students will learn about the vast network of life that exists beneath the ocean's surface, from tiny plankton to great white sharks and giant sperm whales. Students will also find out more about the impact that humans have on the oceans, and how everyone can play a role in protecting the many organisms that live in the vast oceans of Earth.

Space ExplorationCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: SciencePrerequisites: None

Throughout this semester long course, students will explore the history and future of space exploration. We will cover such topics as the space race, the development of NASA, and the possibilities of living on other planets. Students will complete some readings, web quests, and projects as well as quizzes and exams.

Kitchen ChemistryCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: SciencePrerequisites: Biology, Introduction to Chemistry, Applications in Chemistry

This course will be a full year course worth 1.0 credits. It will build from the fundamentals of chemistry and biology by going in exploring how the chemistry impacts our experiences related to food. Students will be asked to design their own food related experiments related to each topic. Some of the topics that will be covered include how salt affects our food and cooking, the chemistry of baking powder, chemical changes during cooking, the chemistry of flavor and an exploration into the chemistry of vegetables. This course will require students to have successfully completed Biology, Introduction to Chemistry and Applications of Chemistry.

Keystone BiologyCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: SciencePrerequisites: Below Basic or Basic on Keystone Biology Exam

This course revisits concepts introduced in the full-year biology course. Students who enroll in this course will have additional practice and remediation of scientific topics, focusing on improving their scores on the Keystone Biology exam. Topics covered include the scientific method, cell, cell processes, genetics, evolution, and ecology.

Physics ACourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: SciencePrerequisites: Algebra 2

Physics introduces students to the physics of motion, properties of matter, force, heat, vector, light, and sound. Students learn the history of physics from the discoveries of Galileo and Newton to those of contemporary physicists. The course focuses more on explanation than calculation and prepares students for introductory quantitative physics at the college level. Additional areas of discussion include gases and liquids, atoms, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear physics.

Social Studies

CivicsCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 9Credits: 1.0Subject: Social StudiesPrerequisites: None

In this two-semester course students learn the beliefs and principles on which the United States was founded and on the functions, structure, and powers of government at the local, state, and national levels. Students learn major political ideas and forms of government throughout history. A significant emphasis is placed on the U.S. Constitution, its fundamental principles and ideas, and the form of government it created. Students thoroughly analyze major concepts of republicanism, federalism, checks, and balances, separation of powers, popular sovereignty, and individual rights and compare the U.S. system of government with other political systems. Students identify the role of government in the U.S. free enterprise system and compare it to the economic systems. Students analyze the impact of individuals, political parties, interest groups, and the media on the U.S. political system, evaluate the importance of voluntary individual participation in a democratic society, and analyze the rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution. Students examine the relationship between governmental policies and the culture of the United States.

US HistoryCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 10Credits: 1.0Subject: Social StudiesPrerequisites: None

In this two semester, course students study the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. Historical content focuses on the political, economic, and social events and issues related to sectionalism and slavery, industrialization and urbanization, major international wars, domestic and foreign policies of the Cold War and post-Cold War eras, and reform movements including the expansion of democratic processes and civil rights. Students examine the impact of geographic factors on major events and analyze causes and effects of the Great Depression. Students examine the impact of constitutional issues on U.S. society, evaluate the dynamic relationship of the three branches of the federal government and analyze efforts to expand the democratic process. Students analyze the impact of t technological innovations on the American labor force. Students will learn contemporary US history including the terrorist threat of the early 21st century and efforts to combat this threat.

World HistoryCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 11Credits: 1.0Subject: Social StudiesPrerequisites: None

In this two-semester World History course, the student will develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. The course emphasizes the development of relevant factual knowledge, leading interpretive issues, and types of historical evidence. Beginning with the earliest known civilizations, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage up to the present. The division of world history into broad chronological periods forms the organizing principle for dealing with change and continuity from the earliest civilizations of the present. Specific themes provide further organization to the course, along with the consistent attention to contacts among societies that form the core of world history as a field of study. A significant portion of the content dealing with the 20th and 21st century is accompanied by video footage, which brings the content alive for students. An interactive timeline helps the student better understand the chronology of the vast history of civilizations.

Contemporary Social Issues A and BCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Social StudiesPrerequisites: None

This course encourages critical thought and discussion on contemporary issues. It will provide students an opportunity to identify and evaluate political, cultural, and economic issues on a local, state, national, and international level. A variety of current news media are used to help students learn how contemporary social issues affect them and an emphasis is placed on their role as constructive citizens in an interdependent world.

World GeographyCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Social StudiesPrerequisites: None

World Geography students study people places and environments with local, regional, national, and international perspectives. Students will understand the influence of geography on the present and past. The course includes study of the physical processes that shape patterns in the physical environment; the characteristics and interrelationships of climates, major land forms, and ecosystems; the political, economic, and social processes that shape regions; types of settlement; the distribution and dispersion of world population; relationships between people, places and environments; and the idea of region. Students will analyze how location affects economic activities in different economic systems. Throughout the world. Students will identify the processes that influence political division s and analyze how different points of view affect public policy priorities. Students will analyze the effects of technology and human modifications on the physical environment.

EconomicsCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Social StudiesPrerequisites: None

This course focuses on the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers.The course also develops students’ familiarity with the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts.

General Social StudiesCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: Social StudiesPrerequisites: None

This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the interconnection between the social sciences. Students will explore history, geography, civics, and economics with a focus on mastering the main ideas and themes presented in each of these areas.

AP® PsychologyCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: Social StudiesPrerequisites: None

The purpose of AP® Psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. A variety of activities, demonstrations, and projects will be provided to meet this goal of instructing scientific and empirical approaches.

Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer Sciences

Health ICourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer SciencesPrerequisites: None

Health I is a one semester, three-unit course designed to explore health and wellness, looking at the different types of health and all of the influences on healthy decisions. Students will investigate life skills, communication skills, decision-making strategies. Additional topics will include adolescence, mental & emotional health, and physical health topics such as nutrition, body image, metabolism, and fitness. Finally, students will learn about methods to minimize health risks in the environment, prevent injuries, and when to visit a health care provider.

Physical Education OnlineCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer SciencesPrerequisites: None

This is a one semester, four-unit course designed to provide students with the basic skills and information needed to begin a personalized exercise program and maintain an active and healthy lifestyle. In this course, students will participate in fitness pre and post assessments in which they will measure and analyze their levels of fitness based on the five components of physical fitness: muscular strength, endurance, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and body composition. Students will also learn more about the benefits of physical activity, as well as the exercise techniques and guidelines that will keep them safe and healthy.

WellnessCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer SciencesPrerequisites: None

Wellness is a one semester course designed to explore teen components of healthful living. Students will receive iPads with pre-installed Apps that will monitor their wellness levels as it relates to physical health (PE, Health-based content) and environmental health (Health, Science-based content). Students will explore ways they can maintain or improve upon their current level of fitness, healthy diet, and environmental awareness and safety.

Health IICourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer SciencesPrerequisites: None

Health II is a one semester, three-unit course designed to continue the exploration of health an d wellness, looking at the different types of health concerns teenager and young adult face. Students will explore topics such as tobacco, alcohol, illegal drug use, as well as appropriate use of medicine and prescription drugs. Other topics will include communicable & non-communicable diseases, physical injuries, and prevention methods. Finally, students will study family dynamics, life changing events, healthy relationships, sexual health, reproduction, fetal development, life staging, and the aging process.

ParentingCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer SciencesPrerequisites: None

Parenting is a one-semester, 0.5 credit stand-alone course designed to teach the importance of caring for children and the unique challenges individuals face as parents. Topics will include: childhood and human development, basic parenting skills, meeting a child's needs, understanding temperament & emotions, developing intellect, teaching values, instilling self-esteem, age-appropriate communication, the dynamics of behavior & discipline, the importance of being a good role model, and reflecting, learning from one's own childhood. This course is not only for current parents, but also future parents, relatives, caregivers, professionals, and people who may have a role in any child's growth and development.

Culinary ArtsCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer SciencesPrerequisites: None

This course is designed to enable all students at the high school level to learn the basics of culinary arts. Students will trace the origin and development of the culinary arts. They will also discuss important contributions made by chefs, notable culinary figures, and entrepreneurs. They’ll analyze how trends in society influence trends in the food service industry. In addition, they’ll examine the social and economic significance of the food service industry. This course also covers topics in health, sanitation, and sanitation, culinary skills, and more. The course is based on Career and Technical Education (CTE) standards designed to help students prepare for entry into a wide range of careers in the culinary industry.

Humanities

Art AppreciationCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: HumanitiesPrerequisites: None

An introduction to the elements of architecture, painting, sculpture, and design; the principles of the fine and applied arts are considered for their immediate relevance to contemporary life; through various media, the student develops his/her awareness of the sensitivity to all forms of art.

Music AppreciationCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: HumanitiesPrerequisites: None

An introduction to music including the elements of music, various musical styles, medias and forms, stylistic periods, and significant composers.

Spanish 1Course Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: HumanitiesPrerequisites: None

Spanish I is an introductory course structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts, and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. Introduction to Spanish- speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heighten cultural awareness and appreciation of the Hispanic world.

French 1Course Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: HumanitiesPrerequisites: None

This course is based on a researched scope and sequence that covers the essential concepts of French. Class discussions provide an opportunity for discourse on specific topics in French. A key support tool is the Audio Recording Tool that enables students to learn a critical skill for French: listening and speaking. Beginning with learning personal greetings and continuing through practical communications exchanges, French 1B introduces students to the skills necessary to make the most of traveling to French-speaking countries.

French 2Course Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: HumanitiesPrerequisites: French 1

Each of these semesters is designed to build on the principles mastered in French 1 and use a combination of online curriculum, electronic learning activities, and supporting interactive activities to fully engage learners. Unit pretests, post-tests, and end-of-semester tests identify strengths and weaknesses, helping to create a more personalized and effective learning experience. As with French 1, these 90-day courses emphasize practical communication skills while also building intercultural awareness and sensitivity. 

Business and Career Technology

Personal FinanceCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: BusinessPrerequisites: None

This semester course is designed to help students prepare for the financial decisions they must face and to make informed decisions relating to budgeting, banking, credit, insurance, spending, taxes, saving and investing, and living independently. They also learn the importance of investing in themselves in order to gain the knowledge and skills valued in the marketplace. This course will provide a foundational understanding for making informed personal financial decisions leading to financial independence.

Cooperative EducationCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 11, 12, 10 with Special PermissionCredits: 1.0Subject: BusinessPrerequisites: C Or higher in core courses

This full year is an elective program open to juniors and seniors. Co-op provides goal-oriented occupational education to students electing this program through on-the-job training. Successfully completing the Cooperative Work Experience will provide the student with a better understanding of the world of work as well as occupational training. Goals of the course will include:

  • ·  Enhancing the co-op student’s educational experience with real-world career related work experience.

  • ·  Allow the co-op student to develop skills and knowledge applicable to an identified career field.

  • ·  Allow the co-op student to explore, through on-the-job experience, the career options related to their academic work, and to verify their career choice.

· Increase the co-op student’s maturity level by exposure to the profession work environment.

· Establish credentials for the co-op student to enhance their opportunities after graduation for employment or admission to college. 

Veterinary Science: The Care of AnimalsCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Business and Career TechnologyPrerequisites: None

As animals play an increasingly important role in our lives, scientists have sought to learn more about their health and well-being. This course examines some of the common diseases and treatments for domestic animals. Toxins, parasites, and infectious diseases impact not only the animals around us, but at times humans as well. Through veterinary medicine and science, the prevention and treatment of diseases and health issues are studied and applied.

Introduction to Military CareersCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Business and Career TechnologyPrerequisites: None

This one-semester course introduces the US military and describes each of its branches, which include the National Guard, Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and Air Force. Students also learn about the relationship of the military reserve to the branches of the military. The course covers non-combat careers in the military, such as military intelligence, information technology, health care, legal services, logistics, aviation, and transportation, and other specialized careers. This course also covers enlistment and fitness requirements for military careers and personal traits that are essential for success in the military. The 16 lessons in the course provide students with both breadth and depth, as they learn about the US Military. Online discussions and course activities require students to develop and apply critical thinking skills while the included games appeal to a variety of learning styles and keep students engaged.

Technology & Design with 3-D PrintingCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Business and Career TechnologyPrerequisites: None

This is a one semester course designed to teach the basic function of a computer, types of computers, the hardware of a computer, operating systems, browsers, Internet-based programs, mobile devices and supportive devices such as 3-D Printing.  This course provides studies with the opportunity to design, create, build, communicate and share ideas in solution concerning real-world problems.

Game DevelopmentCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Business and Career TechnologysPrerequisites: Technology and Design with 3D Printing

In this course, students learn the ins and outs of game development to prepare them for a career in the field. Whether it is the history of video games, character development, mobile game design, user interface design, social gaming, or the principles of development design and methodologies, this 20-lesson course covers it all. As you might guess, games are included in the course to enhance the learning experience and help assess student progress. While fun and highly engaging, the course focuses on laying a strong foundation for a career in game development.

Graphic Design and IllustrationCourse Length: One SemesterGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: Business and Career TechnologysPrerequisites: Technology and Design with 3D Printing

This course will help students develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on topics such as the history of graphic design, types of digital images, graphic design tools, storing and manipulating images, design elements and principles, copyright laws, and printing images. The course is based on Career Technical Education (CTE) standards designed to help students develop technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the graphic design industry.

Miscellaneous

Dual EnrollmentCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 11, 12Credits: 1.0Subject: MiscellaneousPrerequisites: C or higher in core courses

Dual Enrollment provides students with the opportunity to attend a local college or university in order to complete college level work while still enrolled in high school. The following courses may be available: English, Psychology, Sociology, Philosophy, Math, including upper-level courses such as Trigonometry, and Calculus, Science, and History.

Study SkillsCourse Length: One Semester or Full YearGrade Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5 or 1.0Subject: MiscellaneousPrerequisites: None

To support students who are included for academic subject areas. This course will emphasize support in the included area through individualized instruction, study, and organizational skills along with other specially designed instructional strategies. 

SAT PrepCourse Length: Full YearGrade Levels: 10, 11, 12Credits: 0.5Subject: MiscellaneousPrerequisites: None

This full year course prepares for the SAT asynchronously using study.com video and quiz resources. This course will range in reading, writing, math and test taking skills necessary to prepare students for the SAT test. Completion of this course will require a little over one video lesson and a quiz for each school day.